Introduction new ways to design and make

Introduction

 

I have decided to have an emphasis on corsetry and lingerie in my Fashion practice. I’ve always had a keen interest in how the female form has been portrayed in art throughout history, however; I have now changed my perception to see how women choose to portray themselves and how they achieve the desired look expected of them by society. Corsetry dates back as far as 1600 BC and has been used since as part of a woman’s daily routine to either emphasise and exaggerate her assets (Polaire, 1874-1939) or to create the illusion of a very boyish and straight figure (1920s). Although corsets have been used and designed for centuries, this doesn’t deter me from being inquisitive in finding new ways to design and make a wearable and contemporary garment.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

 

Figure 1. Saunders, L, (2017), Draping on the stand, Calico Cotton, UCA

 

During Stage 1 of the course I made a corset like garment which incorporated three dimensional textures to add an aesthetically pleasing design so it could be worn as an outer garment.  The texture was predominantly around the bust area which added more volume to the upper part creating a fuller breast whereas the waist is cinched, creating visually a smaller waist despite it not having the boned structure to actually do so. My design is a contemporary response to a traditional corset however, it does resemble more so a bustier. Although it is a contemporary design, the ruffled texture has a historical link back to Victorian dresses which incorporated this design to add volume and aesthetics.                                         

 

 

 

 

Figure 2. Saunders, L, (2017) Fashion Illustration for Mementos Project, black pen on paper, dimensions, UCA
 
 
My second piece of work is an illustration for one of my final piece ideas. It incorporates the traditional corset aspect of creating a smaller waist and fuller bust however it is inspired by 1920’s art deco. Although the fashion in the 1920’s was to have a very straight and boyish figure, i gathered that the combination of the culture of the decade and a traditional corset garment would come together to create a very modern design. The linear designs would also cleverly act in accentuating the waistline and breasts. The materials I use would reflect that of the 1920’s such as old gold satin and black jewels/sequins for the embroidery.
 
 
 

 

 

                       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-Modernism (before 1850)

 

Figure 3, Unknown, (16th Centaury), Silk and Linen, German Bodies

 

‘The German pair of bodies buried with Pfaltzgrafin Dorothea Sabine von Neuberg in 1598’ is the only known corset which dates back to the 16th century (Figure 3, Arnold, J., Tiramani, J. and Levey, S., 2008, Patterns of Fashion, p.47).

Made up of three layers including silk and linen, a pocket was incorporated at the front of the garment so that a stiff busk (a rectangular piece of ivory, wood, or whalebone) could be inserted. Ranging from 10 to 14 inches in length, and 3/8 of an inch thick, the busk flattened the torso and breast area (pushing the breasts up) creating the desired look of the period. Busks are not always necessary if the wearer has a small chest and the corset is already heavily boned.  Due to its use as an undergarment, the dull cream colour helps to keep it discreet. Tabs and eyelets at the waist helped the wearer to secure and attach the farthingale (stiffened hoop skirt) or petticoat. Although seemingly ingenious, this technology adapted the corset into a practical garment. As seen in Figure 3, the arm holes are quite far back. This was common in the 16th century as it forced a stiff and rigid posture which was considered ‘good breeding’.

A modern audience viewing this garment may see it as quite extreme. However, despite traditional methods being altered (such as the busk), corsetry throughout the years and to this day remain to achieve a similar goal of a flat torso and a smaller waist. Although not intentional, but this garment has a feminist perspective and is an example of how for many centuries woman have to contour their bodies into unnatural shapes to please the male and society’s expectation. This work has influenced my outlook on my past and future projects as I aim to create a modern day corset for the woman but not for her to feel as though she has to alter her body for the satisfaction of others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contemporary (1970 – present)

 

Figure 5, Jean-Paul Gaultier, (2012), Metal, Fall 2012 Collection Gold Cage Corset     

 

A contemporary, almost futuristic garment designed my French designer Jean-Paul Gaultier. Although deemed contemporary, I can’t help but see inspiration and influence form 1920’s art deco. The linear construction and vibrant gold colouring is very typical of that time period. An excellent example of how a designer can subconsciously be influenced by precious works of art or time period and incorporate it into their garments to create a fresh outlook on a contemporary design. The use of the metal resembles 16th century orthopaedic corsets, from a modern perspective these corsets will be viewed as extreme and unpleasant however, when constructed in an aesthetically pleasing way it isn’t seen in the same light. The corset itself is abstract as it’s not your conventional garment and wouldn’t be used in the same way a traditional corset would. It is designed as an outer garment due to its incredible detail and rich colouring. This design to me means more of a celebration of the female form rather than degrading the woman to have to change her body. The large bust and hip area emphasises her natural shape and the gold celebrates and frames her body.

 

Again, I see this design as a feministic piece as it is celebrating the natural form of the model and emphasising her natural features. This design has shown me that there are ways to create a garment that was once used to suppress women and turn it into something shows off a woman natural form.Figure 2. Saunders, L, (2017) Fashion Illustration for Mementos Project, black pen on paper, dimensions, UCA

 

 

My second piece of work is an illustration for one of my final piece ideas. It incorporates the traditional corset aspect of creating a smaller waist and fuller bust however it is inspired by 1920’s art deco. Although the fashion in the 1920’s was to have a very straight and boyish figure, i gathered that the combination of the culture of the decade and a traditional corset garment would come together to create a very modern design. The linear designs would also cleverly act in accentuating the waistline and breasts. The materials I use would reflect that of the 1920’s such as old gold satin and black jewels/sequins for the embroidery. 

Go Top
x

Hi!
I'm Rita!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out