The being trained to fight the aliens.

The third quarter of the novel starts off in the Wright-Patterson air
force base again from the perspective of Ben Parish. Ben Parish talks about
life as a soldier’s trainee. He explains that it is hard work and their squad’s
commander, Reznik, is somewhat insane. They have to go through harsh training
and they Reznik is ruthless. Ben reveals that they’re being trained to fight
the aliens. Ben also reveals his soldier name, Zombie. Everyone in the squad,
including Cassie little brother, Sammy, has a soldier name. Sammy’s is Nugget.
Reznik is revealed to be a cruel and harsh commander, but Ben says he’s preparing
them for their worst. No one gets off easy, not even Sammy, who’s only six
years old. Ben acts as brotherly figure for Sammy during their time at
Wright-Patterson. He guides him through the camp and sticks up for him. The
squad members were in their bunks and then a fight broke out. It was between
“Tank” and the rest of the squad members. Tank later died of an overdose
because he was suicidal and the squad believed it was on purpose. Tank was then
replaced with a girl named, “Ringer”. Ben explains that it was awkward having
her in the barracks the first night but they later become cool with Ringer and
welcome her with open arms. All the squads would compete in weekly standings
and Ben and Sammy’s squad were Squad 53. The squad members continue to work
until their graduation day. Everyone in squad 53 is graduating except for Sammy
because he’s too young. Before the graduation ceremony Reznik took Ben into the
basement of the air force building to have a talk. Reznik tells Ben that they
killed all the adults after they took the children, and Ben is a little shook. He
also reveals that alien infestations were embedded in humans and then send Ben
on a mission where he tells Ben that he has one in four chance of living. The
point of view then switches back to Cassie’s. Cassie is becoming more and more
suspicious of Evan. When she realizes that his soft hands are extremely odd for
a farm boy and he smells like gun powder even though he supposedly hadn’t shot
at anything when he went hunting, she begins to think that Evan’s really a
silencer. Cassie attempts to catch him in the wrong, but fails to do so.
Although, Cassie found her old M16 in the shed and she becomes extremely
frightened because she left it beside the Buick during the interaction with the
silencer because she was scared. Once she confronts Evan about it, Evan comes
up with a good excuse for Cassie to trust him. The point of view then switches
back to Bens and Cassie is not the only one becoming suspicious. On Ben and
squad 53s new mission they uncover and implant in Ringers head and they become
suspicious of why it’s there. Flintstone also noticed there commander, Reznik,
shooting at them. Ben then comes up with a theory that they’re being used and
the soldiers and the people and charge at Wright-Patterson are the aliens and
there using the children to kill off the rest of the human population.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Authors Motive

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I
believe the author’s motive for telling this story was to not trust anyone. The
author communicates the clear trust issues in the novel from every characters
point of view. The author shows what lying did to Evan and Cassie’s
relationship. The entire novel is based off of how being too trusting leads to
your downfall. The kids were far too trusting of the government. Cassie was far
too trusting of Evan and Sammy was too trusting of his Dad and Sister. These
lead to mass destruction, violence, war, and broken relationships. This makes
it evident that the author’s motives in the novel were to communicate that you
should not trust anyone, or be too trusting of anyone. You could also argue
that the author’s motives were him trying to communicate that you shouldn’t
trust anyone that you aren’t really close with. Cassie and Evan had a nice
relationship, but both individuals couldn’t stop lying to each other.   ThemesFate vs. Freewill

Cassie
reveals that she believes in freewill over fate.Cassie
and Evan are talking about Sammy and their plan to rescue him from
Wright-Patterson and Cassie is saying they must go immediately, while Evan
thought they should have waited. Evan later suggest that he goes alone to
rescue Sammy. This
is evident when Evan says, “Let me go” (Yancey. 333).Evan
is asking to go rescue Sammy alone because he doesn’t want anything to happen
to Cassie. Cassie refuses though because she could never put trust and fate
into someone in charge of saving her brother’s life. This is also proven when
Evan wanted to wait until Cassie’s leg was healed to go rescue Sammy. Cassie
once again disagreed, but couldn’t go because she was too weak. This proves
that Cassie believes she controls what happens in hr life, she doesn’t let the
outcomes of fate tell her that she’s not.

Misinterpretation/Misreading

The
theme of Misinterpretation/misreading is developed.Cassie
believes that Evan is a human and not a silencer because he didn’t kill her,
but it was actually because he loved her.Cassie
was often suspicious that Evan was a silencer but always debunked her thoughts
about it because she couldn’t see it. Cassie misreads Evan and when she finds
out he’s an alien and she ask why he didn’t kill her and later saved her Evan
said it was because he loved her. This
is evident when Evan says, “Because I’m in love with you” (Yancey. 362). Evan
is responding to Cassie asking why he hadn’t murdered her already. Cassie
misread Evan for who he really is and Cassie can no longer be with Evan for
obvious reasons. Cassie didn’t think that a person from their species could
bond or love a human being, therefore she also misinterpreted some of the
aliens.Rhetoric and Power

The theme of Rhetoric and power is also developed in
the novel. Cassie uses rhetoric to convince multiple individuals for her
better.Cassie first uses Rhetoric on her little brother Sammy
and then on Evan.At the start of the novel, when Sammy is being taken
away in the bus, Cassie uses rhetoric to convince Sammy that everything’s going
to be fine. She tells him that er and her Dad are going to come later.Cassie uses rhetoric on Evan to not leave the farm
house to save Sammy alone. Cassie persuades Evan to take her with him. Cassie
convinces Evan that going alone would be nothing but a bad idea. She says that
Sammy wouldn’t recognize him, nor believe him. Cassie insisted that it was too
dangerous and she made a promise that she would come and get him when Sammy
left on the bus. Both Sammy and Evan give in to Cassie’s use of Rhetoric.

 

What Themes Allowed Me to Explore a New Perspective

The theme of fate vs. freewill allowed me to explore
new perspectives while reading the novel.This allowed me too realize how indecisive Cassie is.
I never thought of how much more Cassie believed in freewill over fate, but at times,
it also seemed like she believed in fate over freewill. Both are developed in
the novel. This once again proves to me that Cassie is indecisive. Cassie often
reveals that she has internal conflict with herself.

 

 

 

 

What
Have I Learned From the Themes?

I learned that misinterpretation could lead to ones
ultimate downfall. Misinterpretation was a theme developed in the novel form
lots of different characters perspectives. Mistrust proves to be fatal
repeatedly in the novel. It happens when the children training put too must
trust into the government people and when Cassie trust Evan too much.

Why
This is Important to Read 

This novel is important to read because once again, it
reveals the danger of misinterpretation.
After reading this novel, an individual may not want to interpret anything
again. Misreading constantly leads to the downfall of characters in the novel .Are
the Themes Universal?

Yes,
all three themes that I brought up are universal. Anyone can use rhetoric and
power, as well as misinterpret things.

How are they commonly associated with my genre>

Mistrust
is often common in many dystopian novels. The general population cannot usually
trust the government. Almost every dystopian novel has public mistrust. 

 

 

 

 

 

     

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