The religion of Buddhism dates back approximatelyThe religion of Buddhism dates back approximately

The religion of Buddhism dates back approximately 2,500 years ago, and is practiced by roughly 300 million people around the world. To many people Buddhism is not just a religion, but rather it’s a philosophy or a  “way of life.” Some key points in which buddhism is centralized around are, “to live a moral life,” ” to be mindful and aware of thoughts and actions,” and ” to develop wisdom and understanding.”1 Buddhism is practiced by an abundance of people because it provides a purpose to life, it clarifies visible inequality and injustice around the world and essentially it is practiced to live a life in a particular way which will lead to true happiness. The Buddha’s teachings can be condensed into the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path. In the Four Noble truths,the  Buddha epitomized in four points the perspective that allows others to ” awaken, to find the greater freedom and lasting peace and happiness that he had found. These truths were very much as a guide to action, something to be explored , tested and checked out in your own experiences.”2 The First Noble Truth, is that life is full of Dukkha (suffering). Which includes, death, disease, and pain. Enduring in psychological suffering, such as fear, and loneliness is apart of this. Based on the Buddha’s philosophy, suffering is something that is upon everyone, despite their age, race, gender, social class etc… suffering is something everyone goes through, it is apart of human nature. In life there are and uncontrollables and controllables and suffering happens to be something that is uncontrollable. As human beings, we have no say over it, uncontrollables are something that just happens to everyone, and despite how big or little it may be as time passes by, everyone will overcome it.The Second Noble truth says that the “immediate cause of dukkha is tanh? ( translates to craving or attachment to desire.)” 2The role of the second truth is to determine the cause of suffering. In Buddhism, the root of suffering can be seen as ignorance and desire. Desire refers to material goods, pleasure and eternal happiness, all which are wants that rarely can ever be fully satisfied. Whilst desiring all of these, one is going through suffering, attempting to  achieve them.  The Third noble truth is, the end of suffering, which can be attained by true happiness. If all of these desires are eliminated from our lives, then one can truly live a content life. Thus achieving the purest form of happiness, Nirvana. Once Nirvana is achieved, one is transformed into a state away from suffering and is rebirthed, and spiritual enlightenment in upon them. The Fourth Noble truth, is the blueprints for the Noble Eightfold Path, which leads to the liberation of suffering. I will begin by asserting author, John D. Teasdale’s assertion on the role of impermanence, interdependence and no self plays in suffering in relation to the Buddha’s philosophy. In Buddhism, impermanence , interdependence, and no self plays, are central to the Buddhist teachings and are seen as the main concepts of his philosophy.  Now that we’ve seen what Buddhism is primarily based on, I will now present Teasdale’s point of view on his view on the role of impermanence, interdependence, and no self plays in suffering. Teasdale’s article discusses the Four Noble truths and how and why they are essential to the Buddhist philosophy. In Buddhism, impermanence is seen as everything existing impermanently, nothing lasts forever. In Teasdale’s article he talks about impermanence as being an experience everyone shares. He references this to dukkha , more clearly, what I mean by this is that everyone goes through some point of their lives when they fall into a slump of unhappiness. Unhappiness causes suffering which ultimately results in imperiance, nothing lasts forever. Interdependence is defined as “All things exist interdependently – not as permanent essences. Thus, all things are ultimately “empty” – which is the Buddhist teaching of emptiness.”3  What this translates to is that in order for us to be in a state or awareness, we need to be existent. In other words, a tree can’t fall without anyone hearing it. In order to experience joy or suffering, it all depends on whether our  minds are tamed or not. When our minds are tamed, we encounter more capacity to relate with our experiences and surroundings. Once we reach that point, we are able to experience happiness, rather than suffering which is reality. In contrary, when our minds aren’t tamed, we developed a lack of calmness and gain irritability, thus allowing us to experience suffering. Essentially what interdependence is that, we create our own happiness and suffering. It’s the way we choose to handle situations which determine the outcome whether it be happiness or pain. What Tisdale’s article says about this is essentially we are the authors of our own lives and how we choose to write our story entirely depends on our actions and how we decide to handle situations.Liberation from suffering entirely depends on the self , we choose our actions and our actions have consequences, and they wa we decide to handle them, determines whether or not we will liberate from suffering or not.   Lastly, no self plays in suffering, refers to in Teasdales article is that we desire things to be permanent, such as people but in reality that is very unlikely, thus causing us suffering. We have difficulty letting go of things, thus resulting in dukkha. Tisdale’s theory’s intertwined with the Buddha’s philosophy on impermanence , interdependence, and no self plays, thus making them more alike than different. In addition, intellectual and experimental understandings mutually share a common base and depend on each other, as well as reinforce each other. Intellectual understanding refers to the understanding you gain from books, teachers, or other sources. In the Buddha’s case, intellectual understanding is the insight others gain after learning about the philosophy of the Buddha. In order for one to truly understand the intellectual understandings they gain from other sources, they must experience it in order to fully comprehend it. Intellectual and experiential understandings go hand in hand because in order to understand what you’ve have been taught, you need to go out and utilize those learnings and experience them, you need to reinforce what you’ve been thought, If someone talks you through on how to ride a bike, and afterwards you don’t go and try to ride a bike, what’s the point of having someone tell you when your not even going to try. This relates to the Buddhist path of liberation and suffering because, you go through suffering, and the only way to liberate it is to move on from it, use the Buddha’s philosophy, and reinforce it with your issues. The only way to liberate suffering begins with you, and you being able to utilize all your resources given to you. In conclusion, Buddhism is practiced by millions of people everyday,and despite how far it dates back, the core of the philosophy is still the same. Buddhism focuses on are,to b mindful of our actions, develop wisdom, and to live a moral life.The main goal is to provide a purpose to life, it clarifies visible inequality and injustice around the world and essentially it is practiced to live a life in a particular way which will lead to true happiness. The Buddha’s teachings can be condensed into the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path.The Four Noble Truths of Buddhism are broken down into, the existence of suffering, suffering deviating from desires, cessation of suffering when desire ceases, and freedom from suffering by practicing the eightfold path. Essentially, suffering is when we hang ourselves over our desires and things that won’t last forever, and the only way to liberate that is to move on, when our minds aren’t tamed, we developed a lack of calmness and gain irritability,thus putting us in suffering. We create our own happiness and suffering. It’s the way we choose to handle situations which determine the outcome whether it be happiness or pain.